Friday, January 7, 2011

Oriental White Eye


Photo taken at Baroda
Oriental White-eye,
(Zosterops palpebrosus)


  • Description: This bird is small (about 8–9 cm long) with yellowish olive upper parts, a white eye ring, yellow throat and vent. The belly is whitish grey but may have yellow in some subspecies. The sexes look similar. The taxonomy of the group is still unclear with some island populations being distinctive while some subspecies are not well supported. The population from Flores, Indonesia for instance is found closer to the Pale White-eye. The family itself is now questioned since they are nested along with the Stachyris babblers. About eleven subspecies are well recognized. These include the nominate form (type locality Bengal, India) which is found from Oman and Arabia, Afghanistan, northern India and extends into China and northern Myanmar.

  • Distribution: The species is found in a wide range of habitats from scrub to moist forest. They sometimes occur on mangrove areas such as in the Karachi area. And on islands they may lead a more insectivorous life. They are somewhat rare only in the drier desert regions of western India. A feral population was detected in San Diego, California in the 1980s and subsequently eradicated.

  • Behavior and Diet: These white-eyes are sociable, forming flocks which only separate on the approach of the breeding season. They are highly arboreal and only rarely descend to the ground. The breeding season is February to September but April is the peak breeding season and the compact cup nest is a placed like a hammock on the fork of a branch. The nest is made of cobwebs, lichens and plant fiber. The nest is built in about 4 days and the two pale blue eggs are laid within a couple of days of each other. The eggs hatch in about 10 days. Both sexes take care of brooding the chicks which fledged in about 10 days. Though mainly insectivorous, the Oriental White-eye will also eat nectar and fruits of various kinds.

3 comments:

  1. As wildlife biologists, we couldn't be happier about stumbling upon your blog - such a great way for us, and others, to learn new species across the world :)

    -Carrie and Ben

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  2. Nice description of a beautiful bird! Have look at a pair I shot just in front of my terrace.

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=259332520751397&set=o.5448197410&type=1&theater

    Kapil

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi
    Your blog will reminds me the Ranthambore wildlife experience ones again. i would love this bird.
    http://www.compasstours.com

    ReplyDelete